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Control Your Workers’ Compensation Costs

Train all new employees thoroughly. According to research, about 30 percent of claims come from accidents that involve new hires. Employers should review their orientation programs to identify weaknesses and areas for improvement. It is better to be too thorough than not thorough enough with these programs.

Keep safety as the top priority. Not incurring claims is the best way to keep costs lower. Employers should build a culture of safety throughout the workplace that engages workers in their efforts. For example, making safety councils where ideas are solicited from workers about how to make the workplace safer is a useful step.

Screen all potential new hires carefully. Make sure the right workers are hired initially by taking advantage of screening options. Researchers say that workers who are substance abusers are much more likely to cause accidents on the job and sustain injuries. Drug screening programs should be essential in every workplace for possible candidates, and background checks that are applicable with state laws can also help in many instances.

Classify all workers correctly. Classification codes are used to identify workers’ levels of compensation. When employees are not classified correctly, the employer may find coverage is inadequate. There are fines for wrongly classifying workers and not having enough coverage.

Manage all claims proactively. If an employee sustains an injury on the job, it is important for the employer to keep track of the worker’s condition. He or she should also begin planning for the worker’s return as soon as possible. It is better to have the worker come back and perform light duties than to stay off work for a long time waiting to return to his or her traditional heavier duties. Having a worker rejoin the workforce and perform lighter duties is a good way to help reduce a claim as well.